Postcards of the past - a rare glimpse of 19th century Monaco
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The Monte-Carlo Casino
The Monte-Carlo Casino. Photo Library of Congress

Postcards of the past – a rare glimpse of 19th century Monaco

Straight from the archives of the Washington Congress library, these old photographs show the Principality of Monaco in a way not often seen. And to top it off they are in colour.

Captured  between 1890 and 1900 and coloured using a process called “Photochrome”, these photos offer a stroll through time, amongst unrecognizable landscapes, emblematic buildings and missing works.

The principality as seen from Cap Martin:

Principality seen from Cap Martin
Principality seen from Cap Martin. Photo Library of Congress

During those years, Albert I succeeded his father Charles III but the Principality was still an absolute monarchy. The first constitution came in 1911.

The beginnings of urbanisation:

The beginnings of urbanisation
Photo Library of Congress

After about thirty years, following the suppression of taxes by Charles III, construction work accelerated greatly in Monaco.

The waterfront:

Waterfront
Photo Library of Congress

With the rise of real estate, the old waterfront looks very different from the one we know today.

The viaduct of Saint-Devot:

The viaduct of Saint-Devot
The viaduct of Saint-Devot. Photo Library of Congress

Before the bridge was built in 1964, there was the viaduct of Sainte-Dévote, built in 1868.

The Monte-Carlo Casino:

The Monte-Carlo Casino
Photo Library of Congress

Designed in 1879 by the architect Charles Garnier, the casino of Monte-Carlo did not take its current form until 1910, after several extensions were made.

The Monte-Carlo Casino
The Monte-Carlo Casino. Photo Library of Congress

People would walk by the waterfront of the Casino, to fully enjoy the unique panorama of the Mediterranean.

The Casino gardens:

The Casino gardens
The Casino gardens. Photo Library of Congress

Since the end of the 19th century, the gardens of the Casino have always been admired.

L’Opera:

L’Opera
L’Opera. Photo Library of Congress

A few years after building the Casino, Charles Garnier built the Opéra de Monaco, inaugurated in 1879 with a show by Sarah Bernhardt.

Source: www.monacomatin.mc



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