Home / MC Lifestyle / Yachts& Yachting / 42-meter superyacht Lalibela has been destroyed by fire and other yacht news
42-meter superyacht Lalibela has been destroyed by fire
Photo courtesy of Yacht Harbour

42-meter superyacht Lalibela has been destroyed by fire and other yacht news

We selected for you top 4 yacht stories of the last week at Yacht Harbour.

42-meter superyacht Lalibela has been destroyed by fire

42-meter superyacht Lalibela has been heavily damaged due to fire, which broke out at the night while she was docked near Cannes, France. The fire destroyed  the top deck and cabins inside, reports Maritime Bulletin. 

42-meter superyacht Lalibela has been destroyed by fire
Photo courtesy of Yacht Harbour

Two of the firefighters had been injured while extinguishing and two seamen were on board, while the fire broke out, but they succesfully left the vessel without any damage. 

Lalibela was built by Benetti in 1972 and last refitted in 2013. She was available for charter starting from € 75,000 per week + expenses.

No fuel needed for this solar superyacht

The Solar Impact is a yacht for people who want to travel further, without sacrificing comfort, elegance and state-of-the-art technology, and for whom the destination is the actual experience of the journey itself. The Flybridge is a welcoming outdoor space. The view is fantastic and as you watch the sea, all your wishes can come true.

No fuel needed for this solar superyacht
Photo courtesy of Yacht Harbour

This new yacht is a game-changer, not just in terms of its solar propulsion and design. Two aspects that have prevented a pleasant stay on board in the past have also been addressed: rough seas and high noise levels. The innovative solar yacht glides almost silently and without swaying – even over waves several metres high. The hull technology is based on the SWATH (Small Waterplane Area Twin Hull) construction principle.This achieves a physical shaft decoupling that reduces the rolling and heeling of the yacht by up to 90 percent. the hull lies calmly in the water even in strong swells, putting an end to the annoying swaying motion of the boat. But SolarImpact has recognised that the principle offers yet another invaluable advantage: it significantly reduces energy consumption. All systems on board can use the sun as their primary energy source. The yacht‘s solar drive is not only environmentally friendly, but also extremely quiet.

No fuel needed for this solar superyacht
Photo courtesy of Yacht Harbour

The interiors of the Solaryacht were designed for long stays on board with luxurious living areas and spacious cabins. It is especially dedicated to people who know comfort on long journeys and love sophisticated aesthetics. That excellent balance of shapes and the elegance of design make the SolarImpact Yacht an exceptional residence with a view of the sea. On deck you enjoy your own oasis to the sun and an environment where you can relax and unwind in complete peace. The SolarImpact is a yacht for cruisers who want to travel further without sacrificing comfort, elegance and the latest technology, whose goal is the actual experience of the journey itself. The large windows offer unparalleled views and incredible brightness in every area. The interiors are designed to pamper owner and guests with maximum comfort. Light flows into the large open living room, which combines modern taste with a warm and cosy style. 

No fuel needed for this solar superyacht
Photo courtesy of Yacht Harbour

To ensure the perfect functioning of all systems, the required energy quantity of the solar system should be up to 500 kilowatt hours per day. How much energy can the solar system generate? This depends primarily on the geographical location of your yacht and the current weather conditions. The number of daylight hours and the intensity of sunlight are the most important factors. However, the solar system could produce more than enough energy in the world’s most popular sailing areas. The yacht is equipped with a real-time energy monitoring system so that the owner can monitor and make optimum use of energy consumption at all times. Under optimal environmental conditions, the solar system generates up to 320 kWh of electricity (32KW/h peak => 10h), which charges the energy store or drives the yacht.

Seataci – this futuristic superyacht concept throws us back into 2016

The Seataci is yacht concept that uses a biomimetic propulsion system resembling the movement of whale’s tail. Its main hull would be lowered underwater, providing passengers with an excellent underwater view of the coral reefs and marine life. It features a dozen villas and two landing pads specially designed for personal flying drones.

Seataci - this futuristic superyacht concept throws us back into 2016
Photo courtesy of Yacht Harbour

The Seataci would be capable of submerging itself by using a water ballast system to sink its main hull. Two side pods would be used to stabilise the ship, and they would be linked with a hydraulic system that would also double as a dynamic suspension. The ship’s crew and passengers would be able to travel to those pods at any time during the cruise, and passengers could use them as galleries to get a different viewpoint from the ship.

The ship’s engines would be housed in each pod. A biomimetic propulsion system similar to the Iruka concept would be designed to propel the Seataci. This system is basically an oscillating foil that pushes the water like the tail of a whale. It might prove more efficient than propellers, would probably generate less noise under water, and it would allow the ship to sail in shallower waters without breaking its propellers or rudders.

Seataci - this futuristic superyacht concept throws us back into 2016
Photo courtesy of Yacht Harbour

The lower tail section of the main hull would feature an impressive under water experience for the passengers, with large panoramic windows located on each side of the ship. Some of the ship’s suite could be located in that lower section for the view and for the minimal roll. A dining hall or an observatory lounge could also be installed there. On the main deck, a tropical garden would surround a pool next to landing pads for personal drone. The drones could be used by customers to fly to the shore or visit small ‘motu’ or ‘atolls’ nearby.

The Seataci is first and foremost a luxury yacht, but it could also be built and sold as a small scientific or commercial excursion ship. It would be interesting to use it to explore channels or islands located in shallow waters and witness the fascinating underwater life during each cruise. When personal drones become widely available and safe, the Seataci could serve as a landing platform to explore inhabited islands without using boats.

23-meter superyacht Joy delivered to a client in the Mediterranean

Van der Valk Shipyard in the Netherlands has delivered the 23-metre Joy to a delighted client in the Mediterranean. As the latest motoryacht in the popular Flybridge range, Joy features timeless design and cutting-edge equipment. She also benefits from the experienced owner’s distinctive taste and considerable experience.

23-meter superyacht Joy delivered to a client in the Mediterranean
Photo courtesy of Yacht Harbour

First introduced in 2010 and regularly updated, Van der Valk’s Flybridge range remains very popular today. Its elegant appearance, outstanding quality and state-of-the-art technology have stood the test of time, and the yachts are renowned for their excellent value retention. The 23-metre version was launched eight years ago and ten have been built to date. This versatile model is equally suited for families, lone yachtsmen and sailing with a crew.

23-meter superyacht Joy delivered to a client in the Mediterranean
Photo courtesy of Yacht Harbour

The lower deck houses well-appointed accommodations, each with ensuite bathrooms. The full-beam master stateroom amidships is flanked by a VIP cabin forward and two guest cabins, one with a double and one with a bunk bed. There is also a separate full beam crew area with two cabins and a bathroom.

23-meter superyacht Joy delivered to a client in the Mediterranean
Photo courtesy of Yacht Harbour

Joy is propelled by three Volvo Penta IPS800 engines with full joystick control. A Seakeeper 26 gyroscopic stabiliser keeps her stable both underway and at zero speed. An unusual bonus is the RINA classification for recreational craft. Rarely seen on a 23-metre vessel that will not be used for chartering, this was a special request by the owner to ensure the highest safety standards and enhance her commercial resale value.


Related Articles

DMCA.com Protection Status