“La Dolce Vita”. How sweet is it?
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La Dolce Vita

“La Dolce Vita”. How sweet is it?

La Dolce Vita is a well-known expression and in this article we will tell you more about its historical significance and its connection to an exciting visual exhibition this spring and summer.

The period of time from the 1950s-1970s can truly be called the period when Europe began “waking up” after The World War II. As soon as the prior fear and prejudice were left behind, people began to be guided by freedom of choice, and most importantly, freedom of expression. Italy, in turn, became one of the first countries to boldly undertake not only industrial reconstruction, but also a cultural one. Thanks to this, new names appeared in the fields of design, cinematography and art, such as the artist Mario Schifano, interior designers Gio Ponti, Franco Albini, Gino Sarfatti, and many others. By happy chance, all the residents and guests of  Monaco will be able to enjoy the masterpieces of the great modernists, as well as exclusive items from the private collection of the Royal Monegasque family, at the exhibition “La Dolce Vita”.

La Dolce Vita
Source: Gate 5 Gallery

“La Dolce Vita, Italian Modern Design, Art & Fashion in the French Riviera” is an exposition that unites 3 symbolic trends of the “modern revival” era: design, fashion and art. The exhibition is organized by the Gate 5 Gallery, whose offices are located in Monaco. The gallery specializes in modern Italian design of the 1930s-1970s. According to the manager of the exhibition Justin Desperts, the inspiration for its creation was the Dolce Vita period in Italy and Monaco: “Dolce Vita is a certain lifestyle that began to emerge in Italy after the film “La Dolce Vita” by Frederico Fellini. This is the period of new creations.

La Dolce Vita
Source: Gate 5 Gallery

Everyone started thinking about how to renovate their house properly after the war, then interior design also became very important …”

“La Dolce Vita” Must See

The most exclusive elements of the exhibition are the vintage interior details and clothing of the absolute Dolce Vita icon, Her Majesty Grace Kelly and the canvas of the famous avant-garde artist Mario Schifano.

So what can we see?

From the wardrobe of Grace Kelly:

– the dress by Helen Rose from 1956, which the Princess wore for her civil marriage ceremony;

– the dress by Lenvin that Grace wore on the 13 October 1959 at the meeting with General Charles de Gaulle in Paris;

La Dolce Vita
La Dolce Vita

– the dress by Helen Rose from the movie “High Society” directed by Charles Walters;

La Dolce Vita

– The coat in which Grace arrived for the first time in Monaco on the boat the “Constitution”;

La Dolce Vita

Moreover, all the outfits were provided to the gallery after the accord of

Carolina of Hanover and some dresses will be exhibited publicly for the last time.

From the boudoir:

– Elegant and almost transparent library from the designer Franco Albini;

La Dolce Vita

–  Mirrors from Carlo Scarpa – 1939 (an exclusive collaboration of Scarpa and Murano);

La Dolce Vita

– Weightless locker from Gio Ponti, which was specially designed for the Hotel Royal in Naples;

La Dolce Vita
Source: Gate 5 Gallery

From the visual arts:

– Painting by Mario Scifano from 1969, No. 3 degli archive del Futurismo, as a demonstration of true Italian avant-garde;

La Dolce Vita
Source: Gate 5 Gallery

From cinematography:

– at the specially adapted mini-cinema a Documentary will be screened about the life of Monaco and the Royal family during the Dolce Vita period. The film was created thanks to collaboration between Gate 5 Gallery and the Audiovisual archive of Monaco.

La Dolce Vita

It is important to note that each element of the exposition is unique, and represents the strife between artists and the routine. The main task of the Italian modernists was to show ordinary things in an eccentric way, in order to respond to the booming American Pop culture. As a result, the Fiat 600 appeared, the first concept of a small family car, and its cheaper version, the Fiat 500, and, what’s more, there is the film of the well-known Italian director Frederico Fellini, “La Dolce Vita” from 1959 that won The Palme D’Or at the Cannes Film Festival in 1960. The movie describes the cultural formation of the Italian elite in the post war period.

The exposition “La Dolce Vita” in Monaco is located at 4 Quai Antoine 1er and will be open to visitors until June 30. Entrance is by appointment only.

So if you are interested in learning more about the historical and visual impact of La Dolce Vita then be sure to visit the exhibition this spring or summer, and don’t forget to make an appointment.



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