Yachtharbour: Why we're in the golden age of megayachts
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Project Jupiter
Project Jupiter

Yachtharbour: Why we’re in the golden age of megayachts

According to Yacht Harbour, the number of yachts over 80 meters has sharply increased over the past few decades and, with Lurssen launching 3 megayachts over 100 meters in under a week, it seems we have now entered into the golden age of megayachts.

In the past week, Germany-based Lurssen has launched the 123-meter Project Jupiter, the 111-meter Project TIS and an unknown 130m+ superyacht which does not seem to be matching any known project at the shipyard. The shipyard’s phenomenal growth however does not stop with those 3 projects as the German builder has the 75-meter Thor, 85-meter Sasha, 112-meter Palo Alto and 139-meter Redwood under construction at the moment with the 106-meter Project Mistral having already undergone sea trials earlier this year.

This demand for megayachts is however not specific to only Lurssen. Dutch-based, Oceanco have recently launched a new 88.5-meter superyacht and have completed a 106-meter sailing yacht which are now moored together at their Alblasserdam facility. The shipyard is also working on the 110-meter Project Jubilee, which is scheduled to become the largest yacht built in the Netherlands upon its delivery, and is rumored to be a replacement for Ronald Perelman’s C2.

Project Jubilee
Project Jubilee

Turquoise Yachts, the new brand of Proteksan Turquoise following its acquisition by Oceanco’s billionaire owner, Al Barwani back in 2014, is also working on a megayacht of its own with a 77-meter as well as a 66-meter already in construction. Another player in the megayacht space in Turkey has emerged to be Bilgin. Indeed, the shipyard has just announced it had sold a second 80-meter superyacht to a repeat client, having had already sold their first 80-meter hull to a repeat client back in October 2015. Turkey-based, Dunya Yachts are also building 100m Project Blade for the owner of Axioma.

Project Blade
Project Blade

More established players in the yachting industry are also strengthening their position in the expanding market at the same time. LVMH-backed Feadship, has recently delivered Steve Wynn’s 92-meter Aquarius, a year after delivering 101-meter Symphony to LVMH CEO, Bernard Arnault. Italy-based Benetti is also working on a new flagship with a 107-meter megayacht currently under construction and scheduled for delivery in 2019.

Understandably, this growing demand for megayachts has sparked interest amongst shipyards normally specializing in smaller ranges of the market. Heesen, who have just delivered their latest flagship, the 70-meter Galactica Super Nova, are now working on an 85-meter dry dock to be able to expand their flagship size. Amels, who are about to deliver their 83-meter flagship, Here Comes The Sun, have also announced their plans to compete in the 80-110m space through their Full Custom division.

Here Comes The Sun
Here Comes The Sun

All of this demand at existent shipyards is also complemented by commercial shipyards, venturing into superyacht construction. Norway-based, Kleven have for example recently delivered Ulysses to New Zealand’s richest man, Graeme Hart and are working on a 116-meter yacht for the same owner.

The brokerage side of the megayacht market is also becoming more active with the recent listing for sale of M/Y A by Andrei Melnichenko, the 115-meter Ona (ex. Dilbar), by Alisher Usmanov and the recent reported sale of Pelorus to a Chinese billionaire. Our guess it’s therefore just a matter of time before the 200-meter barrier is breached.



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